ISSN 1311-9109 Journal Content





RELATED
CONFERENCES
International Symposium
on Production and Establishment of Micropropagated Plants
April 19-24, 2015,
Sanremo, Italy


Propagation of Ornamental Plants
12(1): 58-62, 2012

SOFTWOOD CUTTING PROPAGATION OF THREE POLYGONELLA
WILDFLOWER SPECIES NATIVE TO FLORIDA

Mack Thetford1*, Alison E. O’Donoughue2,
Sandra B. Wilson
3, and Hector E. Pérez2

1 West Florida Research Education Center, University of Florida, 5988 Highway 90, Building 4900, Milton, Florida, 32583, USA, *Fax: + 1-850-983-5774,
*E-mail: thetford@ufl.edu
2
Environmental Horticulture Department, Gainesville, Florida, USA
3
Indian River Research Education Center, University of Florida,
Fort Pierce, Florida, USA


Abstract
Largeleaf jointweed (Polygonella macrophylla), October flower (Polygonella polygama), and sandhill wireweed (Polygonella robusta) are wildflowers that exhibit good form and showy flower displays within their natural growing environments. To broaden production and landscape use when seed is not available, asexual propagation has been explored as a potential alternative to seed produced transplants. Softwood cuttings of each Polygonella species were collected from natural areas in Florida to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of various concentrations of K-IBA on rooting, and (2) determine the effect of propagation substrates on rooting success. The basal portion (1 cm) of terminal stem cuttings (8 cm) prepared from current season growth were treated with one of four concentrations (0, 1,000, 2,500, or 5,000 mg l-1) of K-IBA using the quick-dip method (5 s) prior to planting in Fafard 3B or a mixture (50 : 50 by volume) of horticultural grade perlite and medium grade vermiculite and placed on greenhouse benches with intermittent mist. Approximately 7 weeks after planting, cuttings were evaluated for: rooting, root number, and length of the longest root. Rooting percentages of 80% or greater were achieved with K-IBA at concentrations of 1000 to 5000 mg l-1. Little or no difference in rooting percentage or root number was evident between the two propagation substrates.

Key words: asexual propagation, jointweed, october flower, Polygonella macrophylla, Polygonella polygama, Polygonella robusta, wireweed



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